Adventures, Mindanao, Newspapers, Only in Davao, Places, Published Works, Strange and Amusing, Trivia
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D’ Japanese Tunnel in Davao

01272014 DJapaneseTunnel by Jojie AlcantaraBy Jojie Alcantara [published in SunStar Davao,  January 27, 2104

After World War II, the legend of the Yamashita treasure seduced many treasure hunters to Davao, particularly in Mintal, Tugbok District (now declared as the Japanese Heritage Site of the City), where hiding places for the war loots were supposedly buried deep underground within numerous foxholes and crisscrossing tunnels built by soldiers and prisoners of war.

 

D' Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

While I have visited one other Japanese tunnel excavated in a private property, the only popular tunnel open to the public is D’ Japanese Tunnel Family Resort and Restaurant along Hillcrest Subdivision, Diversion Road in Matina Balusong.

D’ Japanese Tunnel in Davao © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel in Davao © Jojie Alcantara

Owned by the Lim family, the manmade hideout said to be built in 1942 and accidentally discovered during the national highway’s construction in the 60s has now expanded into a family hotel and restaurant with a swimming pool for kids.

D' Japanese Tunnel Hotel © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel Hotel © Jojie Alcantara

Many stories curiously thrive about this tunnel, which officially opened in 2001.  It is said to have connecting underground passageways to Samal Island, the foothill of Mount Apo and other areas.  For now though, only 300 meters of damp underpass is readily accessible to the tourists, at a P50 entrance fee for adults and P20 for children. The rest of the long tunnel is blocked off.

D’ Japanese Tunnel in Davao © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel in Davao © Jojie Alcantara

With a tourist guide, you are led to a dimly lit entrance that opens wide but narrows down as you go further inside the tunnel.  History is recounted of Filipinos kept in tiny prison cells, as well as cubicles for quarters, ammunition compartment, meetings, secret routes and storage for goods and weaponry.  A replica of “Daibutsu”, world’s largest gilded bronze Buddha in Todai-ji Temple, is on display in one of the chambers.

D' Japanese Tunnel Davao © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel Davao © Jojie Alcantara

Statues of soldiers in varying poses from the entrance down to several cavities in the tunnel reenact historical scenes.  A small cell turned into a “wishing well” where coins are strewn on the floor is watched over by a guard statue on post.

D' Japanese Tunnel prison cells © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel prison cells © Jojie Alcantara

In the late afternoon, mist would form inside the passageway because trickling water on walls and ceilings are coming from a cold stream that passes through a canal and a well.  The trip may be short but the female guide was engaging, relating other stories where cameras of visitors captured other-worldly experiences and orb sightings. Disappointingly, nothing came out of my camera.  She suggested we come back by sunset, when the atmosphere gets interestingly creepier.

D' Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

Edible-nest swift birds (“balinsasayaw”) huddled inside makeshift nests stuck on the ceilings, their saliva a most sought after expensive delicacy for birds’ nest soup.  Don’t leave the tunnel without a photo beside the Kimono-clad Japanese statue carrying a dainty parasol.

D' Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

D’ Japanese Tunnel © Jojie Alcantara

The tunnel is open between 9am until 8pm daily.  Hotel room rates vary from P900 (single) up to P3960 (suite), while they have function rooms open for events. For inquiry and bookings, email djapanesetunnel@ymail.com or find them on Facebook.

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About Jojie Alcantara

Jojie Alcantara is a multi-awarded photographer, writer, artist and TV personality whose works are featured in tourism campaigns (It's More Fun in the Philippines), covers and spreads of books and international magazines. She is a frequent traveler in search of inspirational stories and heartwarming images of nature and people. She is also a brand endorser and advocate, social media influencer and motivational speaker who gives photography workshops to universities and organizations. A former TV host, she has done a few commercials, several hosting gigs and speaking engagements. In 2013, she received an award from the City Government of Davao for her significant contribution in the social media. She has been a web designer/blogger since the 90s and has seen the evolution of the internet and social media transition from the perspective of a traditional media person.

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Filed under: Adventures, Mindanao, Newspapers, Only in Davao, Places, Published Works, Strange and Amusing, Trivia

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Jojie Alcantara is a multi-awarded photographer, writer, artist and TV personality whose works are featured in tourism campaigns (It's More Fun in the Philippines), covers and spreads of books and international magazines. She is a frequent traveler in search of inspirational stories and heartwarming images of nature and people. She is also a brand endorser and advocate, social media influencer and motivational speaker who gives photography workshops to universities and organizations. A former TV host, she has done a few commercials, several hosting gigs and speaking engagements. In 2013, she received an award from the City Government of Davao for her significant contribution in the social media. She has been a web designer/blogger since the 90s and has seen the evolution of the internet and social media transition from the perspective of a traditional media person.

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